Pocket pr0n!
Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon

There are many ways to create a double-welt pocket, but this is my favorite for a very fast and easy pocket. This method involves no measuring (that’s right!), and no interfacing. Best of all, it’s really easy to memorize. This translates to great-looking welt pockets that come together very quickly.

This method is also ideal for very spongey, thick, or wonky fabrics that don’t respond well to fiddling. I came up with it after dicking around for wayyyyyy too long with this perfectly lovely ponte that was bulky and terribly susceptible to pressing transfer.

This method only needs a few supplies!

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon

At left: shell fabric (houndstooth), pocket bag (shot cotton), and welt fabric (typically the same for shell but, for the sake of this tutorial, a dark brown). You also need 7/8″ grosgrain ribbon,basting spray (or gluestick), and marking chalk.

I like to use a fine cotton, as I like to tear (not cut) my pocket bags. Very fast, very accurate. If you use satin or some other foolishness, you will need to cut.

As with any welt pocket treatment and any new technique, please make a sample first!

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon

Cut a piece of ribbon that is at least 2″ longer than your pocket. Lightly spray the grosgrain on one side, and lay the ribbon along the crossgrain of a piece of welt fabric, making sure the welt fabric is about 4″ wide. Pro-tip: I spray by placing the ribbon in my wastebasket, so the trash liner catches any overspray.

Next, sew two channels a generous 1/4″ from the grosgrain edge, using a basting stitch. I like to stitch in the same direction for both channels. You don’t want to stitch any closer to the edge than this 5/16″, or the threads may show in the welt lips.

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon
This is what your stitches will look like on the other side:Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon
Now, flip the assembly with the ribbon side facing up. Fold over one edge, snugging it against that ribbon. Stitch at 3/16″ from the folded edge, using a regular stitch:
 
Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain RibbonTutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon
Now, cut 1/8″ from that stitching line:Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon
Repeat with the other side, folding and stitching, then trimming from that stitching line:

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon

So for pocket placement, you really only need your vertical end marks! Pin the welt to the right side of the shell fabric, with the trimmed part of the welt facing up. Pin well and, if you’ve already done a sample and are working on the garment, you can use this opportunity make and align the other welt to the corresponding side:

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon
Now, we’re going to stitch the welt to the garment – think two parallel lines (NOT a rectangle). Stitch right on top of those previous 3/8″ stitching lines, making sure to stop and carefully backtack right at the ending marks of the pocket. Unless the fabric is very shifty indeed you can confidently backtack – but if you are worried, leave long tails at these four ends, pull the ends to the welt-side after stitching, knot, and secure the thread tails in the welt.

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon
You really want these stitching lines to be a very scant 3/8″ although this is why you make a sample – because the turn of the cloth will vary a bit depending on what you’re sewing:

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon

Here is the backside of the work – two parallel lines. Make sure to double check before proceeding.

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon

Now cut the welt I (not the shell) right down the middle:
Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon

Next, you want to cut from the backside, catching only the shell (not the welt). You want to cut to the stitching lines, and right exactly to those stitching lines. Make sure to make a very long triangle at these ends. I like to start cutting at the triangle point that intersects the center line, and cut right to my stitching lines using a very sharp scissor. Then I cut the center line.

Welt Pocket Tutorial (cutting)

Now flip it! FLIP IT GOOD! From the front side of the work…

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon
Push the welt through the back, being very gentle with those little triangles but giving them a bit of a tug. The ribbon welt will lay SO nice and flat and the little triangle will rest on top:

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon
This is how it looks – no pressing or stitching yet! Very promising:
Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon

So go ahead and flip your shell back and, using a zipper foot (or not, but it’s handy), stitch that triangle right to the welt. The ribbon will help the welt lips lie wonderfully close together. Repeat with both sides.
Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon

Time for the pocket bag!

Two things, before we proceed.

1. If you want, you can tear or cut a shell facing strip, to put at the top right side of the pocket bag. This is pretty standard, especially for a pocket that may gape. For kidswear or casual wear or a small pocket, I don’t add the facing bit as it is unneccesary and adds bulk, and pocket gap is not an issue.

2. This pocket treatment looks gorgeous enough it does not need a lining to obfuscate it. That said, the only application I would install these without a lining, would be the back of trousers. In that case, make sure your pocket bag strip is very long, so you can bring up the top edge to later snug it into the waistband of the trouser – a really classic look.

OK so – here is our trouser bag, torn at the exact width of the welt, which I have trimmed to about 5/8″ past the pocket width:

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon
Now how long do you make the bag? Well I like to measure such that the torn bottom edge overlaps the bottom raw edge of the welt by 1/4″, and the fold is no deeper than the bottom edge of the garment (obviously). If this is confusing you, don’t worry. If your pocket bag ends up too long, because you can always stitch it shorter. I love the neat look of the fold at the pocket bag bototm, but it’s also standard to stitch a U-shaped curve and cut the fold off. Reminder: that torn edge at right, on the trouser application I described above, will extend much further than the top welt raw edge.

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon
So let’s stitch that top edge! Go ahead and place the assembly right-side up, and flip down the top edge of the shell. Stitch, using that zipper foot, and aligning the pocket bag just a little past the welt raw edge. No need to back-tack here, as we’ll be catching the stitching line with our side seams – but do use a short stitch length:

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon

Here is that gorgeous seam, as it finishes:

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon
Here’s the right side with a finished top welt edge and the pocket hanging all the way down, not yet pinned to the welt’s bottom raw edge:

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon

Now bring that bottom edge up, getting ready to stitch, tucking it under the pocket:

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon
Go ahead and stitch the raw edge of the pocket bottom to that bottom welt, just as you did the top welt:

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon
Now finger-press the pocket down, and prepare to stitch your side seams! Make sure you stitch the side seams down the right way, or you’ll make an upside down pocket (ask me how I know this!). If the pocket is going to be visible in any way – or if like me you just like accuracy – go ahead and trace your stitching lines straight down from your side seams, before stitching:

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon
You can leave these side seams as they are, or pink them. If I was using a trouser application, I’d probably pink, bind or serge them, depending on the weight of my trouser fabric (this houndstooth is too thin for binding).

Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon
Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon

All done! Good work. 🙂
Tutorial: Double-Welt Pocket w/Grosgrain Ribbon