Vesper Fox!

vesper fox!

Vesper Fox!

I am in love with the bamboo stretch french terry from Nature’s Fabrics. Just – in love. So far I’ve made my family several hoodies, I’ve made hoodies for clients, and today I debut a little toddler fox outfit (from the fabulous Max & Meena MEGAMAX raglan in 2T/3T, and the Alex & Anna PJs in 3T) – along with a hand-crotcheted beanie.

Vesper Fox!
I was sewing ears into hoodies before it was trendy, and I’ll keep doing it even if other people get tired of it!

Vesper Fox!

All the threads are color-coordinated to look good both on the outside of the garment…

Vesper Fox!

… and the inside! Shown below – the waistband (elastic enclosed) at left – the hood lining at right:

Vesper Fox!
Pretty sure this outfit is ready for action!

Vesper Fox!

Who knows how much holiday sewing I’ll be doing – for clients, for friends, for family. Life has been incredibly busy lately – supporting my daughter in her first 15 credit quarter at school, taking on more web design, and taking care of a full household!

I hope you are staying warm, safe, healthy and happy.

 

Super-Friendly Rainbow Puffer Vest

super-friendly rainbow puffer vest

For the winter!
Super-Friendly Rainbow Puffer Vest
This project was a teensy bit challenging – but when has that stopped me? My friend wanted a princess-seamed vest in outerwear fabrics – not too shiny, with rainbow motifs and a vintage feel. For the shell I chose a water-resistant nylon packcloth from the lovely RockyWoods, and underlined with two layers – a polyfleece, and a high-loft winter underlining medium.

Super-Friendly Rainbow Puffer Vest

The collar has only a one underlining fabric in fleece, to keep bulk down. Facings around hem, neckline, and front placket.

Super-Friendly Rainbow Puffer Vest
Snaps! Size 24, metal. And you get a tiny peek at the very cool corduroy-style Malden Mills fleece lining. I chose it for the “vintage” effect of a wale fabric.

Super-Friendly Rainbow Puffer Vest

The rainbow section of the vest was first carefully pressed (pressing a nylon fabric isn’t super fun), then crackstitched to a muslin underlay, before applying to the rest of the garment. If I hadn’t put this underlay in, you’d be able to see some of the seam allowances too starkly.

Super-Friendly Rainbow Puffer Vest
I’m a big fan of an underlap. You can make it from something cute if you like – a contrast fabric or even a pieced rainbow placket. Whatever you like. Here, I chose the burgundy for underlap, inner collar, hem facings, and placket facings.

Holiday Robe Sew-Along Badge

holiday robe sew-along: cutting & marking

Join the Holiday Robe Sew-Along!

 Holiday Robe Sew-Along Badge

It is hard to believe it, but the sew-along is here. This is a simple project – perhaps the easiest in my year-long roster – but due to the large swatches of yardage, it still needs a little TLC. To that end – and given we’re using a somewhat intermediate pattern style – if you have any questions please contact me through comments, through email, or on Facebook!

So there’s no time like the present, to get started! Am I right?

Settle Down!

Holiday Robe Sew-Along Badge

holiday robe sew-along: supplies

Join the Holiday Robe Sew-Along!

 Holiday Robe Sew-Along Badge

 

As promised, here is a bit of a supplies post for the Holiday Robe Sew-Along, starting on the 10th of this month.

So first, I absolutely love this robe. I generally throw it on after showering, putting my hair up, and donning my undergarments. The jersey is so cool, and the drape and volume give a very elegant but modest effect so I don’t mind, say, answering the door if someone knocks.

Holiday Robe Sew-Along

For this sew-along we only need our pattern, our fabrics (if sewing a floor-length for an adult, I wouldn’t order fewer than five yards), and optional interfacing for the belt (you’ll want a knit or tricot interfacing; I favor Fashion Sewing Supply‘s products).

Holiday Robe Sew-Along
And before I talk fabrics, I am well-aware that sew-along peeps usually bend the rules. 🙂

The pattern I am using for the robe SAL is a pattern suited for knits or wovens, and carries a lot of ease. A lighter-weight fabric is the best choice, due to the sheer volume of the robe – especially if you’re going floor-length. My fabric choices below will highlight lightweight knits in either cotton, modal, or rayon (or a combination) – with or without lycra. You want to make sure your fabric is not sheer (unless sheer is the look you want). But remember, you can make this robe out of a variety of fabrics so if you want to try something else, post in the comments and I will give you my advice.

Obvious choices for this robe are solids, yarn-dyed stripes, and florals.

Green Jersey Fabric

Stripe Jersey Fabric

Floral Jersey Fabric
In alphabetical order, a few shops I’ve used in the last year that I’ve enjoyed working with.

Cali Fabrics is a great, quick source for inexpensive, good knits. You can search their knits by colorway. Imagine a glamorous Christmas-evening robe in this gold-on-navy sparkle knit; a playful daytime robe in this wonderful apricot jersey; something dramatic like this rose-print black and red. (You may notice the robe I demonstrate for this sew-along was made from the floral-on-sage rayon knit in this shop.)

Fabric.com is one of my staple sites. Not fast shipping, but free shipping. And they have a huge catalog of knit fabrics. I often search with highest price first, because you can find quality yardage at good prices that way.

FashionFabricsClub is rumored to be in cahoots with Fabric.com (let me know if you know better than I). They have a real hit-and-miss reputation, but the last time I purchased from them their customer service was fabulous. You can do a search on jersey knit or rayon knit to get started.

Similar to Cali Fabrics in quality and price, Girl Charlee carries great knits, and they are fast and inexpensive. Start at their knit section and work from there; cotton jersey and cotton lycra are both great choices, with lycra sporting a springier feel.

If you are interested in a cotton solid, imagine gnats is a great shop and Rachel is a wonderful person to order from! Her knit collection holds several laguna solids, which are great (and gorgeous) all-purpose solids (note: prices are per half yard).

Mood Fabrics has some of the most gorgeous fabrics around. Start in their knit/jersey section and go from there (look at this eggplant with metallic stars!). Fast shipping, too! Their customer service “Chat” function is very disappointing. But otherwise, I’ve been very happy with Mood.

There’s always Nature’s Fabrics – one of my favorite shops, hands-down. They have a lovely selection of cotton jersey prints and stripes. Many of their fabrics are knits, so searching a few other fibers yields wonderful results (like this rayon slub).

So there you have it! More than enough to get you started. Remember, you can email me or comment here if you want any guidance!

See you on the 10th!

Classic Long Robe by Bootstrap

holiday robe sew-along: save the date!

Join the Holiday Robe Sew-Along!

 Holiday Robe Sew-Along Badge

 

Holiday Robe Sew-Along

Holiday Robe Sew-Along

Welcome back! I hope you had a wonderful time with our Costume Workshop – or whatever it is you’ve been sewing and creating this fall season.

For my November sew-along, we’ll be making the “Classic Long Robe” from Bootstrap:

Classic Long Robe by BootstrapI will be adding a neckline facing (from each hem and along the shawl collar), and omitting the breast welt pocket. I will also walk you through how to add length – the robe is essentially tea length, and for the version shown here (a size 16 at 5’5″, modeled by my 5’5″ size 8 daughter) I wanted a floor-length robe with a gorgeous drape (achieved!). I will also be walking us through how to create invisible stitching for our facings and hems; and a quicker machine-stitched finish as well.

There are many robe patterns out there; and in fact, Bootstrap has several robe patterns that would work with a rayon knit. The version I selected has a lot of wearing ease, so making it in a traditional heavy terry or even flannel would result in a very cozy, very voluminous experience. This is why we’re using a light knit: making it in a light rayon (or bamboo, which is also a form of rayon) makes it just as cozy, but a lot lighter weight. Of course you can make your robe up in almost anything! Comment below if you have questions. I will be covering fabric suggestions a bit more in our next post.

[ Edit – for those of you who elect to print a Bootstrap pattern on 8 1/2″ by 11″ pages, sew-along participant Kristine has some helpful information as to assembly ]

I’ll put up a supply post in a couple days – and we’ll get started cutting and sewing on the 10th!

 

Holiday Robe Sew-Along

Bootstrap Flannel / Vado Jeans

bootstrap flannel shirt & (another pair of) vado jeans

Bootstrap Flannel / Vado Jeans

Shirt: Bootstrap Fashion’s free blouse (modified, details below) in Toasted Almond from Robert Kaufman’s “Mammoth” line.
Jeans: Vado custom block (from Jeanio) – boyfriend-style fit with fitted hip. Mid/heavyweight denim (very low stretch) from Pacific Blue.

One of the first intermediate garments I sewed, was a flannel shirt. Listen – I live in Aberdeen, Washington and while we didn’t invent the plaid flannel per se, we sure got it on the scene. In the early 90s – when I sewed my first shirt – the typical M.O. was to find them at thrift stores. I hadn’t filled out yet – I was still a relatively petite C-cup – so I’d buy what was available: the men’s flannels.

Of course, menswear doesn’t fit most women’s bodies in a comfortable or practical way. For me, the shoulders too broad and the arms were too long. The shirt hipline was too narrow yet the waist was baggy. I think that is what my fourteen year old self must have been chasing, when she purchased a lovely raspberry and green soft cotton flannel and embarked on the adventure.

I remember my mom and I squabbled every step of the way. A menswear-styled shirt isn’t exactly a beginner project: you have the cuff plackets and the front placket and fiddly collar and collarstand and pockets! Then there’s the narrow curved hem – ugh! We argued throughout the creation but 

These days I pretty much take menswear shirting to #levels. I am constantly pursuing better craftsmanship and new methods. Plaids are amazing because while they take a little extra work to match – the . For this reason, I don’t both using any flannel that isn’t pretty decent quality. And flannel can be tricky that way. It can look great on the bolt – but once you’ve prewashed, turned to rubbish! The “Mammoth” line has been very satisfactory so far and I picture myself sticking with it until I’ve chomped my way through several more of their lovely colorways!

Bias-cut pockets:

Bootstrap Flannel / Vado Jeans
(SUUUUPER cheap plastic buttons because they were the best color in my stash!) –

Bootstrap Flannel / Vado Jeans

And yes, those are bias-cut cuff plackets, and a bias-cut cuff. I interface the cuff, but not the placket. While interfacing a placket can be very helpful at times, in general you want to use a very, very light interfacing. The medium/heavy weight of the flannel meant interfacing the plackets was not wise. The cuffs, collar, and collarstand interfacing made for a very rugged-feeling shirt.

The entire shirt is french-seamed and I achieved a perfect curved armscye:Bootstrap Flannel / Vado Jeans

Curved baby hem – another potentially frustrating seam to pull off:

Bootstrap Flannel / Vado Jeans

Here’s my noir photo of my shirt. Being all mysterious ‘n’ shit:Bootstrap Flannel / Vado Jeans
Finally: I modified the Bootstrap shirt in only two ways – the sleeves, and to add breast pockets. I modified the sleeves for a cuff placket, and to narrow the sleeves. I wanted to be able to wear the plackets open, but have them not flop! Two pleats at the cuff as per tradition.

Now let’s move onto the jeans!

I’ve hosted two jean sew-alongs so it hardly seems like I should keep telling y’all how I make them. I will say this denim was just wonderful to work with. It was mid-to heavyweight, which feels good for a fall/winter jean. It also had a very firm hand. And the blue/black indigo colorway is drool-worthy, especially when coupled with the traditional goldenrod thread work:

Bootstrap Flannel / Vado Jeans

Those who’ve been with me a while will remember my Miniature Giant Japanese Baby Bunting and the wonderful fabric I used. Well today I finally got to use the last little bit of this fabric! I used it for my pocketbags and waistband facing, and because I used a crossgrain facing and pieced this facing, I really did use the last bit of this fabric economically. SO SATISFYING!

Bootstrap Flannel / Vado Jeans

While I am not totally averse to a curved waistband, steaming the curve into the crossgrain uses less fabric (therefore less bulk), and makes for a better performance and finish – IMO:

(Also note how fly my fly is!):

Bootstrap Flannel / Vado Jeans

Some more fly action – belt carrier made from the selvedge:Bootstrap Flannel / Vado Jeans

Stitcwork meeting at the center back yoke:
Bootstrap Flannel / Vado Jeans
My own little pocket graphic. I accidentally sewed the pockets on the wrong side – usually the larger curved motif is at the outseam! Brass rivets, zipper, and snap:

Bootstrap Flannel / Vado Jeans

Here’s my butt. You’re welcome.Bootstrap Flannel / Vado Jeans

Happy li’l #PNW lady!Bootstrap Flannel / Vado Jeans